Now Available: Blessed Jonathan Daniels + the Martyrs of Alabama

Now available! Blessed Jonathan Daniels + the Martyrs of Alabama. This is an 8 x 10 one-color print from a linoleum block and comes matted to 11 x 14 ready for framing. This print is available for $50.00, and I can arrange delivery or pickup in the Birmingham area. I am happy to venture to the Post Office with an additional amount for the postage/mailing costs. I can also make delivery at the Annual Jonathan Daniels Pilgrimage in Hayneville, AL, on Saturday, August 10, 2019.

To purchase a print, please contact me.

Jonathan Daniels was an Episcopal seminarian who answered Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s call for clergy and people of faith to come to Alabama in 1965. He is celebrated as a martyr in The Episcopal Church with his feast day being observed on August 14. Each year the dioceses of Alabama and the Central Gulf Coast lead a pilgrimage in Hayneville, AL, the place where Daniels was martyred. This pilgrimage concludes with a service of Holy Communion celebrated in the courthouse where the man who killed Daniels was acquitted by an all-white jury. This service remembers Daniels and the Civil Rights martyrs of Alabama. (Learn more)

IMG_3617    Icon Legend

1 Elmore Bolling was found riddled with shot gun and pistol shots 150 yards from his general merchandise store. Bolling also ran a small trucking business. He was lynched because he was “too successful to be a Negro.” (Dec. 4, 1947, Lowndesboro, AL)

2 Willie Edwards Jr., a truck driver, was on his way to work when he was stopped by four Klansmen. The men mistook Edwards for another man who they believed was dating a white woman. They forced Edwards at gunpoint to jump off a bridge into the Alabama River. Edwards’ body was found three months later. (Jan. 23, 1957, Montgomery, AL)

3 William Lewis Moore, a postman from Baltimore, was shot and killed during a one-man march against segregation. Moore had planned to deliver a letter to the governor of Mississippi urging an end to intolerance. (Apr. 23, 1963, Attalla, AL)

4 Jimmie Lee Jackson was beaten and shot by state troopers as he tried to protect his grandfather and mother from a trooper attack on civil rights marchers. His death led to the Selma-Montgomery march and the eventual passage of the Voting Rights Act. (Feb. 26, 1965, Marion, AL)

5 Cynthia Wesley, 14, belonged to the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church where she was fatally wounded when a bomb went off. The church had been a center for civil rights meetings and marches. (Sept. 15, 1963, Birmingham, AL)

6 Carole Denise McNair, 11, belonged to the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church where she was fatally wounded when a bomb went off. The church had been a center for civil rights meetings and marches. (Sept. 15, 1963, Birmingham, AL)

7 Carole Robertson, 14, belonged to the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church where she was fatally wounded when a bomb went off. The church had been a center for civil rights meetings and marches. (Sept. 15, 1963, Birmingham, AL)

8 Addie Mae Collins, 14, belonged to the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church where she was fatally wounded when a bomb went off. The church had been a center for civil rights meetings and marches. Her younger sister Sarah was injured in the blast but survived. (Sept. 15, 1963, Birmingham, AL)

9 Jonathan Myrick Daniels, an Episcopal Seminary student in Boston, had come to Alabama to help with black voter registration in Lowndes County. He was arrested at a demonstration, jailed in Hayneville and then suddenly released. Moments after his release, he was shot to death by a deputy sheriff. (Aug. 20, 1965, Hayneville, AL)

10 Viola Gregg Liuzzo, a housewife and mother from Detroit, drove alone to Alabama to help with the Selma march after seeing televised reports of the attack at the Edmund Pettus Bridge. She was ferrying marchers between Selma and Montgomery when she was shot and killed by a Klansmen in a passing car. (Mar. 25, 1965, Selma Highway, AL)

11 Rev. James Reeb, a Unitarian minister from Boston, was among many white clergymen who joined the Selma marchers after the attack by state troopers at the Edmund Pettus Bridge. Reeb was beaten to death by white men while he walked down a Selma street. (Mar. 11, 1965, Selma, AL)

12 Willie Brewster was on his way home from work when he was shot and killed by white men. The men belonged to the National States Rights Party, a violent neo-Nazi group whose members had been involved in church bombings and murders of blacks. (Jul. 18, 1965, Anniston, AL)

13 Samuel Leamon Younge Jr., a student civil rights activist, was fatally shot by a white gas station owner following an argument over segregated restrooms. (Jan. 3, 1966, Tuskegee, AL)

14 Johnny Robinson, 17, was killed by the police during the violent aftermath of the bombing of 16th Street Baptist Church in 1963. (Sept. 15, 1963, Birmingham, AL)

15 Virgil Lamar Ware, 13, was riding on the handlebars of his brother’s bicycle when he was fatally shot by white teenagers. The white youths had come from a segregationist rally held in the aftermath of the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church bombing. (Sept. 15, 1963, Birmingham, AL)